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June 2015
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1

  1. Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    10 am, Bldg 735, CFN Conference Room A, 1st Floor

    Hosted by: Chuck Black

    The attempt to use thin films of block copolymers (BCPs) as the templates for nanofabrication, known as BCP lithography, has recently become a subject of special interest since the BCP can spontaneously form highly uniform nanostructures smaller than the resolution limit of current lithographic tools. For technological applications, the nanostructures of BCP thin films often must be controlled by design. In this talk, the strategies to control nanostructures of BCP films with the designed boundary conditions will be discussed. The final morphology of BCP films are not only affected by the interfacial interaction at the bottom substrate but also affected by the free surface of BCP films. Interfacial engineering for both interfaces of BCP films enables us to achieve specific, sought-after domain orientations. This interfacial engineering becomes especially critical for further reducing the feature size of BCP down to sub-10 nm, which requires the use of BCPs that can form smaller feature than the scaling limit of PS-b-PMMA. Experimental and theoretical delineation of the design rules for directed self-assembly (DSA) of high resolution BCP films will be discussed. Finally, the interfacial engineering that enables the easy release of directed assembled BCP films from the guiding templates will be also introduced. By using this strategy, pre-DSA BCP films on a single template can be transferred to the wide range of template-free substrates. This BCP printing method will widely broaden the application area of BCP lithography.

2

  1. Chemistry Department Seminar

    10 am, Bldg 735, CFN, Conference Room A, 1st Floor

    Hosted by: Chuck Black

    The attempt to use thin films of block copolymers (BCPs) as the templates for nanofabrication, known as BCP lithography, has recently become a subject of special interest since the BCP can spontaneously form highly uniform nanostructures smaller than the resolution limit of current lithographic tools. For technological applications, the nanostructures of BCP thin films often must be controlled by design. In this talk, the strategies to control nanostructures of BCP films with the designed boundary conditions will be discussed. The final morphology of BCP films are not only affected by the interfacial interaction at the bottom substrate but also affected by the free surface of BCP films. Interfacial engineering for both interfaces of BCP films enables us to achieve specific, sought-after domain orientations. This interfacial engineering becomes especially critical for further reducing the feature size of BCP down to sub-10 nm, which requires the use of BCPs that can form smaller feature than the scaling limit of PS-b-PMMA. Experimental and theoretical delineation of the design rules for directed self-assembly (DSA) of high resolution BCP films will be discussed. Finally, the interfacial engineering that enables the easy release of directed assembled BCP films from the guiding templates will be also introduced. By using this strategy, pre-DSA BCP films on a single template can be transferred to the wide range of template-free substrates. This BCP printing method will widely broaden the application area of BCP lithography.

  2. Nuclear Physics Seminar

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Jin Huang

    While hydrodynamics is regarded as the dominant paradigm for describing heavy-ion collisions at RHIC and LHC energies, its applicability to nuclear reactions is not very well understood. Open question remain about the mechanism of rapid thermalization, initial conditions, treatment of decoupling (conversion of the fluid to particles), finite system effects, and quantum corrections in very small systems, for example. In a recent work (arXiv:1502.05572) we showed that in the AMPT transport model elliptic flow is generated quite differently from hydrodynamics, mainly through anisotropic escape from the collision zone. I will demonstrate that this is, in fact, a general feature of kinetic theory, originating in the modest opacities <Ncoll> \sim 4-5 in AMPT calculations. Implications of the escape effect will be discussed together with connections to other hydro related problems such as proper particle distributions (arXiv:1404.8750) and anisotropic flow from quantum mechanics (arXiv:1404.4119).

  3. Physics Colloquium

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Peter Petreczky

    Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) is the sector of the Standard Model of particle physics that describes the strong interaction, deceptively simple to formulate but notoriously difficult to solve. Heavy quarkonium is a multiscale system that probes the different energy regimes of QCD, from the high-energy region, where an expansion in the coupling constant is possible and precision studies may be done, to the low-energy region, dominated by confinement and the many manifestations of the nonperturbative strong dynamics. Properties of production and absorption of quarkonium in a medium are also crucial for the study of QCD at high density and temperature. On the theoretical side, the construction of new nonrelativistic effective field theories for quarkonium has recently revolutionized the field providing both a conceptual framework and a powerful calculational tool. On the experimental side, the diversity, quantity and accuracy of the data collected in the last few years at B and tau-charm factories and at RHIC and LHC experiments is impressive, featuring the observation of new states and new unexpected processes. I will discuss these theoretical and experimental advancements and their implications for our understanding of strong interactions.

3

  1. Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

  2. HET/RIKEN Seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Chien-Yi Chen

4

  1. Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    10 am, Bldg 735, CFN Conference Room A, 1st Floor

    Hosted by: Chuck Black

    emiconducting polymers are central to emerging optoelectronic applications and tremendous efforts have gone towards establishing reliable structure-property-performance relationships. Among the essential structural parameters that have a direct impact on device performance, the degree of order of the semiconducting polymer is the most crucial, yet least characterized parameter, which makes designs and improvements towards next-generation materials difficult. In this presentation, recent successes in our laboratory towards quantifying semi-crystalline order of semiconducting polymers will be presented. We determine what correlations exist, if any, between X-ray, DSC, and optical measures of order in P3HT and its PCBM-61 blends. Additionally, we employ energy filtered transmission electron microscopy (EF-TEM) in combination with the measured degrees of crystallinity to see whether any insight can be gained into the structure of the P3HT amorphous phase in the BHJ, and discuss whether any of these measures provides insight into OPV device performance.

  2. English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) Event

    12 pm, CFN, Bldg 735, lst Floor, Conference Room A

    Hosted by: T. Sampieri

  3. RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    12:30 pm, Building 510 Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Tomomi Ishikawa

  4. Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    1:30 pm, 2nd Fl Lecture Room ISB

    Hosted by: Robert Konik

    We discuss novel routes to obtain superconductivity in semiconductors. We consider a semiconductor with a band dispersion where there is a band edge, such as semiconductors with Rashba spin-orbit coupling or bilayer graphene with a voltage between the layers. We find robust superconductivity, both p-wave and s-wave depending on the type of band edge, for semiconductors with attractive interactions (such as those caused by phonon exchange) when we tune the chemical potential close to the band edge. We also consider photo induced superconductivity in a two band semiconductor. We use optical pumping to induce nonequilibrium populations within the bands. We find robust superconductivity for appropriate chemical potential and dispersion relations for the bands. This s-wave superconductivity can be induced by both repulsive and attractive interactions depending on the exact band dispersions. Various band geometries are discussed.

  5. Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    4 pm, ISB 2nd floor seminar room

    Hosted by: Robert Konik

    We consider quenches of integrable models. We derive a Yudson representation applicable to finite sized systems. Using this representation we find expressions for the time dependence of density density and related correlation functions for an arbitrary quench of the repulsive LiebLiniger gas. We use this to show that the GGE formalism is applicable to the long time limit for quenches of the Lieb-Liniger gas with sufficiently regular initial states. We then show that no similar GGE formalism applies to quenches for integrable models with bound states (such as the XXZ model or the Hubbard model). We study several specific examples of quenches, in particular quenches where the initial state is a Mott insulator or has low entropy. We find the exact quasiparticle density for such quenches and use it to study the long time limit of some correlation functions for the system. We also consider quenches of confined systems, in particular the Lieb-linger gas in a box. We show that the GGE formalism applies to the long time average of such quenches. We use this observation to compute the long time average quasiparticle density for some quenches similar to the Quantum Newton's cradle quench experiment. We also compute various correlation functions for the system in particular the probability distribution for the particle velocity.

  6. Office of Educational Programs Event

    5:30 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Hosted by: Mel Morris

    @0 schools and 150 students will present their environmental projects

5

  1. Nuclear Theory/RIKEN seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Soeren Schlichting

    Charmonium production in pA collisions is known to be suppressed by shadowing and absorption. There are however nuclear effects, which enhance charmonium yield. They steeply rise with energy and seem to show up in LHC data for J/psi production in pA collisions. In the case of heavy ion collisions produced charmonia are additionally suppressed by final state interaction in the created dense medium. On the contrary to current evaluations of the melting effects caused by Debye screening, a charmonium produced with a large pT easily survives even at high temperatures. Another source of charmonium suppression, missed in previous calculations, color-exchange interactions with the medium, leads to suppression of a comparable magnitude. A quantitative comparison is performed.

6

  1. No events scheduled

7

  1. No events scheduled

8

  1. Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    2 pm, CFN Bldg. 735 Second Floor Conference Room B

    Hosted by: Mingzhao Liu

    Identification of active non-noble metal catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction remains a critical materials challenge in the development of electrochemical energy storage and conversion technologies. Recently, we have demonstrated that alpha nickel hydroxide supported on graphene oxide (-Ni(OH)2/GO) displays a surprising activity for the oxygen reduction reaction in alkaline media. In comparison to -Ni(OH)2 alone or graphene oxide alone, the -Ni(OH)2/GO material displays a lower onset potential and higher peak current density, suggesting a synergy between the GO support and the -Ni(OH)2 material. In order to gain insight into the mechanistic origin of the synergy between the -Ni(OH)2 particles and the GO support, we present a comprehensive kinetic analysis of the supported and unsupported -Ni(OH)2 catalyst. Electron transfer numbers, kinetic rate constants, and reaction orders determined through rotating disk electrode linear sweep voltammetry provide preliminary evidence for similar elementary steps occurring on supported and unsupported -Ni(OH)2, but modifications in activity arising from differences in the activation energy for adsorption of O2 and of reaction intermediates.

9

  1. Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    11 am, Bldg 735, CFN Seminar Room, 2nd Floor

    Hosted by: Houlin Xin

    Data are observations of some unknown phenomenon we like to gain more insight on. There are no limits in the number of attributes this phenomenon can have, and it may or may not have a spatial reference. The number of attributes that are being measured depends on the number of channels of the sensor that is used to acquire the data. In 3D imaging we usually have a single channel that measures the attenuation of some beam of energy. The spatial reconstruction of the measured phenomenon can then be accomplished by some form of inversion, either rooted in mathematics or in numerical optimization. I will discuss a few examples where we have made contributions to research " X-ray Tomography and Electron Tomography. These reconstruction products are then easily visualized with 3D rendering. On the other hand, data that do not have a spatial reference get reconstructed in information spaces. The difference here is that the locations in these information spaces do not need to be reconstructed via tomography " they are explicitly given. And so the challenge is not the spatial reconstruction " rather, it is the mental reconstruction of the phenomenal once the number of attributes goes above 3. I will show a few examples of the types of visual techniques we have devised to help in the comprehension of these high-dimensional phenomenal. Bio: Klaus Mueller received a PhD in computer science from the Ohio State University. He is currently a professor in the Computer Science Department at Stony Brook University and the chair of the Computer Science Department at SUNY Korea. His current research interests are computer graphics, visual analytics, medical imaging, and high-performance computing. He won the US National Science Foundation CAREER award in 2001 and the SUNY Chancellor Award in 2011. Mueller has authored more than 170 peer-reviewed journal and conference papers, which have been cited more than 6,000 times. He is a freque

10

  1. BSA Noon Recital

    12 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

  2. HET/RIKEN seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Chien-Yi Chen

    I will discuss interpretations of the recent updated angular analysis of the B->K*mu+mu- decay by the LHCb collaboration. A global fit to all relevant measurements probing the flavor changing neutral current b->s mu mu transition shows tensions with Standard Model expectations. Assuming hadronic uncertainties are estimated in a sufficiently conservative way, I will discuss the implications of the experimental results on new physics, both model independently as well as in the context of models with flavor changing Z' bosons.

11

  1. BSA Distinguished Lecture

    1:30 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Hosted by: Peter Wanderer

  2. Particle Physics Seminar

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Ketevi A. Assamagan

    The dark photon, A′,, and the dark Higgs boson, h′, are hypothetical constituents featured in a number of recently proposed Dark Sector Models. We will present a search for these particles in the so-called Higgs-strahlung channel, e+e''A′h′, with h′'A′A′. We investigated ten exclusive final-states with A′'e+e', μ+μ', or π+π', in the mass ranges 0.1 GeV/c2 <mA′<3.5 GeV/c2 and 0.2 GeV/c2 <mh′<10.5 GeV/c2. We also investigated three inclusive final-states, 2(e+e')X, 2(μ+μ')X, and (e+e')(μ+μ')X, where X denotes a dark photon candidate detected via missing mass, in the mass ranges 1.1 GeV/c2 <mA′<3.5 GeV/c2 and 2.2 GeV/c2 <mh′<10.5 GeV/c2. Using the entire 977fb'1 data set collected by Belle, we observed no significant signal. We will also discuss prospects for searches for light dark matter and the dark photon in the radiative decay process at Belle and Belle II.

  3. Community Advisory Council Meeting

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

12

  1. Particle Physics Seminar

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Ketevi Assamagan

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) project at CERN Laboratory in Geneva has achieved one of its primary goals, i.e. the discovery of the Higgs boson particle, which completes the Standard Model of particle physics. However, no signatures of new physics beyond the Standard Model have been observed yet, despite thorough searches. Nature turns out to be subtle. The direct search will continue in the upcoming LHC runs, however new physics can also be pursued indirectly by looking for deviations of experimental results from predictions in measurements of Standard Model processes. The LHC has provided a large data set during its first years of operations. This has been used to perform measurements of Standard Model processes that constrain predictions in the strong and electro-weak sectors and are sensitive to new physics in a model-independent way, thanks to the high level of precision and the extent of their kinematic reach. A good understanding of these processes is of paramount importance for precision Higgs physics, as well as for searches for new physics, as they constitute irreducible backgrounds. After presenting a selection of highlights of recent Standard Model measurements from the LHC, I will discuss how the precision and phase space reach of these measurements will improve in future LHC runs, given the increase of centre-of-mass energy and integrated luminosity, emphasising some of the experimental challenges ahead.

  2. HET/RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    12 pm, Building 510 Room 2-95

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

13

  1. No events scheduled

14

  1. No events scheduled

15

  1. No events scheduled

16

  1. Center for Data-Driven Discovery

    10:30 am, John Dunn Seminar Room, Bldg. 463

    Hosted by: Robert Harrison

    Hypothesis driven modeling and its validation in the past took the reductionist approach where a scientist made a testable hypothesis. Such hypothesis driven analysis was the critical piece of scientific discovery. However, nowadays, due to the advancements of instrumentation, computational hardware and frameworks, we face a tsunami of data from the instruments or simulations and thus the hypothesis driven discovery has met serious challenges in scientific breakthrough. The information technologies addressed these issues using machine learning and data science approaches. In this talk, I will present the data driven modeling approach and show how machine learning can expedite the scientific discovery and share my vision for future data driven discovery.

17

  1. Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

  2. HET Seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  3. English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) Event

    4 pm, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Hosted by: T. Sampieri

18

  1. Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    10 am, Bldg 735, CFN, Conference Room A, 1st floor

    Hosted by: Chuck Black

    For nanostructures to act as building blocks for next-generation technologies, we need to understand how they interact with light when key parameters such as shape, size and carrier density are tuned. Moreover, equally important is to know how the nanostructure's near-field environment also modifies its properties. In my talk, I will cover several examples where careful tuning of nanoarchitectured systems " fabricated by a combination of chemical and physical techniques such as hydrothermal growth, atomic layer deposition and pulsed laser deposition coupled to high-resolution electron beam lithography " leads to insights about tailoring light-matter interaction in various fields. These studies, performed in conjunction with advanced in-situ optical, electronic and structural characterization and verified with full-field 3D electromagnetic simulations, will include (i) using subwavelength, highly crystalline nanospheres to fabricate a solution-processed thin-film laser with thickness and energy-input threshold at least an order of magnitude lower than previously demonstrated; (ii) fabricating large-scale areas of nanostructured photocatalysts with a light-absorbing core and surface-active shell heterostructures for enhanced water-splitting activity, where we also disentangle and quantify the respective bulk and surface contributions; (iii) designing and characterizing hybrid optical nanomodulators with an active volume of only 0.002 µm3, achieved by spatially confining light on the nanometer length scale using plasmonic nanostructures while simultaneously controlling the reactive near-field environment at their optical focus with single, precisely positioned phase-change nanostructures.

  2. RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    12:30 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Daniel Pitonyak

    We show by solving Maxwell's equations in the presence of chiral magnetic current that the chiral anomaly would induce the inverse cascade of magnetic helicity. We found at late time, the evolution of magnetic helicity spectrum is self-similar and axial charge decays as a power law in time. We visualize how a linked magnetic configuration would evolve into a knotted configuration in real space during such evolution.

  3. Particle Physics Seminar

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Morgan May

    I will report on the first detection of lensing of the cosmic microwave background by dark matter halos. Halo lensing of the CMB provides a method for constraining cluster masses complementary to optical weak lensing, with the advantage that the source plane has a very well determined redshift and statistical properties. In this work, the lensing field was reconstructed from CMB temperature observations using the ACTPol telescope and stacked at the location of CMASS galaxies which trace dark matter halos of ~10^13 M_solar galaxy groups, providing a 3.2 sigma detection and a ~35% mass constraint. I will also briefly touch on the capabilities of future CMB experiments to use this method to constrain dark energy parameters.

  4. PubSci

    7 pm, The Bahche 191 7th St, Brooklyn, NY 11215

    Invite your friends and colleagues to a lively discussion for the science-interested (or just plain curious) and chat with scientists in an informal and friendly way. No stuffy lectures " just a dynamic talk with a diverse audience and a lot of good cheer. Physicists who work at Brookhaven's particle collider will talk about how they explore what happened at the dawn of time from a Lab on Long Island. How did the Universe take shape? What binds matter together? How do we answer those questions?

19

  1. Nuclear Theory/RIKEN seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Soeren Schlichting

    The advent of the LHC opened up new perspectives for jet-quenching physics. For the first time, high enough energies are reached in heavy-ion experiments to produced jets in large numbers, and the unprecedented detector capabilities of ALICE, ATLAS and CMS, not only extend the kinematic range for the measurements previously performed at RHIC, but also allow to explore a variety of new jet-quenching observables. In this talk, I address the question of the angular broadening of jets in the presence of a dense QCD matter. I start by discussing the fundamental mechanisms underlying the formation of gluon cascades induced by multiple interactions of high energy jets with the quark-gluon plasma. Then, the rate equation that describes the evolution of the energy and angular distribution of the in-medium gluon shower is presented and solved. Two remarkable phenomena emerge. First and foremost the energy spectrum (of jet constituents) exhibits a scaling behavior characterized by a constant flow of energy towards low momenta akin to wave turbulence. As a result, energy is rapidly transported from the energy containing partons to low momentum gluons before it dissipates into the medium. Second, medium-induced gluon cascades develop and transport energy at parametrically large angles with respect to the jet axis. This picture is in semi-quantitive agreement with a recent CMS analysis of the missing energy in asymmetric dijet events where the energy balance is recovered at large angles and very soft particles.

20

  1. No events scheduled

21

  1. No events scheduled

22

  1. Chemistry Department Seminar

    4 pm, Room 300, Chemistry Bldg. 555

    Hosted by: Dr. Xiao-Qing Yang

    TBA

23

  1. No events scheduled

24

  1. BSA Noon Recital

    12 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

  2. Brookhaven Lecture

    4 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Hosted by: Thomas Watson

  3. English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) Event

    4 pm, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Hosted by: T. Sampieri

25

  1. English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) Event

    12 pm, CFN, Bldg 735, lst Floor, Conference Room A

    Hosted by: T. Sampieri

  2. RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    12:30 pm, Building 510 Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Daniel Pitonyak

    The chiral condensate of one-flavor QCD is continuous when the quark mass crosses zero. In the sector of fixed topological charge though, the chiral condensate becomes discontinuous at zero mass in the the thermodynamical limit. To reconcile these contradictory observations, we have evaluated the spectral density of the Dirac operator in the epsilon domain of one-flavor QCD. In this domain, we have obtained exact analytical expressions which show that the spectral density at $\theta = 0$ becomes a strongly oscillating function for negative quark mass with an amplitude that increases exponentially with the volume. As is the case for QCD at nonzero chemical potential, these strong oscillations invalidate the Banks-Casher formula and result in a chiral condensate that is continuous as a function of the quark mass. An additional subtlety is the effect of the topological zero modes which will be discussed as well.

26

  1. Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Soeren Schlichting

    We introduce an event-by-event perturbative-QCD + saturation + hydro ("EKRT") framework for ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions, where we compute the produced fluctuating QCD-matter energy densities from next-to-leading order perturbative QCD using a saturation conjecture to control soft particle production, and describe the space-time evolution of the QCD matter with dissipative fluid dynamics, event by event. We perform a simultaneous comparison of the centrality dependence of hadronic multiplicities, transverse momentum spectra, and flow coefficients of the azimuth-angle asymmetries, against the LHC and RHIC measurements. We compare also the computed event-by-event probability distributions of relative fluctuations of elliptic flow, and event-plane angle correlations, with the experimental data from Pb+Pb collisions at the LHC. We show how such a systematic multi-energy and multi-observable analysis tests the initial state calculation and the applicability region of hydrodynamics, and in particular how it constrains the temperature dependence of the shear viscosity-to-entropy ratio of QCD matter in its different phases in a remarkably consistent manner.

27

  1. No events scheduled

28

  1. No events scheduled

29

  1. Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    1:30 pm, ISB Bldg. 734, Conf. Rm. 201 (upstairs)

    Hosted by: Mark Dean

    Transition metal oxides have come to the forefront of condensed matter research in the past several decades due to their highly diverse phase space and remarkable susceptibility to external tuning. This has lead to their prevalence in the pursuit of designer phases, i.e. room temperature superconductivity, topological phases, and etc. In this talk we explore several methods for engineering the ground state of these systems including "ordered doping", applied epitaxial strain, and superlattice heterostructuring in an effort to gain further insight into the microscopic origin of this tunability. We employ synchrotron based x-ray spectroscopy and resonant diffraction to elucidate the explicit origin of the observed anomalous behaviors. In particular, our results reveal the ability to mask the effects of spin-orbit coupling in heavier oxides and to suppress or enhance bulk phase transitions by design.

30

  1. Nuclear Physics Seminar

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Oleg Eyser

    The heavy ion collision provides a unique many-body environment where local domains of strongly interacting chiral medium may occur. Certain anomalous transport processes, forbidden in usual medium, become possible in such domains. These anomalous chiral effects have their microscopic origin at the fundamental quantum anomaly and manifest themselves macroscopically in hydrodynamic currents. In the first part of this talk we report our recent finding (arXiv:1504.03201) of a new gapless collective excitation, called the Chiral Vortical Wave (CVW) in a rotating quark-gluon plasma. The CVW wave equation will be derived, and we show that its solutions describe nontrivial CVW-induced charge transport. We further propose and estimate possible experimental signals. In the second part of this talk we report our state-of-the-art simulations of the long-sought-after Chiral Magnetic Effect (CME), performed in the anomalous hydrodynamic framework and taking into account identified background contributions (arXiV:1504.06906). We discuss the implications of our results for the experimental search of CME

  1. JUL

    1

    Wednesday

    Instrumentation Division Seminar

    "Some thoughts of LAr readout and signal-processing needs for ATLAS Phase-II upgrade"

    Presented by Yun Chiu, Ph.D., University of Texas

    2:30 pm, Large Conference Room, Bldg. 535

    Wednesday, July 1, 2015, 2:30 pm

    Moving towards continuous data readout and transmission in the future Phase-II upgrade of the LAr Calorimeter creates a few technical challenges for the front-end electronics design as well as the back-end signal-processing needs. Particularly, the elevated pileup corruption to the data samples at an unprecedented luminosity level dictates a revision of the linear optimal filtering (LOF) approach currently deployed in the ATLAS experiment. In addition, the analog front-end (AFE) architecture needs to be revisited for supporting an ultra-high dynamic range (16-18 bits), in anticipation of any potential future evolution to a highly integrated, low cost implementation platform or technology for further power and cost reductions. In this talk, a few topics along these lines will be addressed with some preliminary results showcased in an attempt to meeting these challenges, including an extended LOF algorithm for continuous sequence detection and an AFE behavioral modeling platform.

  2. JUL

    2

    Thursday

    RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    "Short-distance matrix elements for D-meson mixing for 2+1 flavor lattice QCD"

    Presented by Chia Cheng Chang, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

    12:30 pm, Building 510 Room 2-160

    Thursday, July 2, 2015, 12:30 pm

    Hosted by: Tomomi Ishikawa

  3. JUL

    10

    Friday

    Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    "Cu-CHA in Emission Control"

    Presented by Dr. Xiaofan Yang, BASF Corporation

    11 am, CFN, Building 735, conference room A, 1st fl.

    Friday, July 10, 2015, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Qin Wu

    Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar Cu-CHA in Emission Control Dr. Xiaofan Yang BASF Corporation Friday, July 10, 2015 11:00 a.m. Building, 735, Conference Room A Chabazite supported Cu is the most promising catalyst platform for implementing a NH3/urea-based Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) system to remove hazardous NOx gases from the lean-burn engine exhaust. Whereas in-depth spectroscopic and other studies have attempted to identify key features of the catalytic cycle previously, a deep understanding of the SCR mechanism amenable for a systematic improvement of the catalyst performance continues to be elusive. To establish a more rational approach to catalyst optimization and identify chemically sound design principles based on the thermodynamics and kinetics of the key steps of the underlying NOx-transformations we developed a quantum chemical model and benchmarked it to match vibrational data from Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform spectroscopy resulting in plausible assignments of each observable intermediate to specific oxidation states of Cu and NO-binding properties. This approach allows for making a much more precise assignment of the experimental vibrational data to key intermediates potentially involved in the catalytic cycle of the SCR reaction and provides a high-resolution model that can be examined to develop a micromechanistic proposal for the catalytic reaction cycle that is chemically meaningful and is logically consistent. In addition, the presentation also covers industrial application utilizing Cu-CHA in emission control. Host: Qin Wu

  4. JUL

    10

    Friday

    C-AD Accelerator Physics Seminar

    ""Cascaded Longitudinal Space Charge Amplifier for Short-Wavelength Radiation Generation at Fermilab's ASTA""

    Presented by Aliaksei Halavanau, Northern Illinois University

    11 am, Bldg 911B, Large Conf. Rm., Rm. A202

    Friday, July 10, 2015, 11:00 am

    "Longitudinal space charge (LSC) effects are generally considered as detrimental in free-electron lasers as they can seed unwanted energy modulations and emittance growth. There has however been an increasing interest in devising accelerator beam lines capable of sustaining this LSC instability as a mechanism to operate as a coherent light source. In such a cascaded longitudinal space charge amplifier (LSCA), initial noise present in the beam density is amplified via the interplay of longitudinal space charge forces and properly located dispersive sections. To date most of these studies have been carried out with a one-dimensional impedance model for the LSC. We use an available grid-less three-dimensional N-body ``Barnes-Hut'' algorithm to simulate the 3D space charge force in the beam combined with ELEGANT and explore the limitations of the 1D model often used. We investigate, via numerical simulations, the performances of a cascaded LSCA beam line at the Fermilab's Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA)."

  5. JUL

    21

    Tuesday

    Sambamurti Lecture

    "Seeking the Origin of Asymmetry"

    Presented by Xin Qian, Brookhaven National Laboratory

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, July 21, 2015, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: Laurence Littenberg

    Why are we made of matter, not antimatter? Where such asymmetry comes from remains one of the biggest mysteries in physics. In this talk, the speaker will take you through the process how physicists design a scientific experiment aiming to address this important question. We will examine the thinking behind, review the current progress, and discuss the challenges in the future.

  6. JUL

    29

    Wednesday

    BSA Noon Recital

    "Pianofest- II"

    12 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Wednesday, July 29, 2015, 12:00 pm

  7. JUL

    30

    Thursday

    Colloquium

    "Atmospheric Chemistry Colloquium for Emerging Senior Scientists (ACCESS XII)"

    8 am, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, July 30, 2015, 8:00 am

    Hosted by: Ernie Lewis

  8. JUL

    31

    Friday

    Colloquium

    "Atmospheric Chemistry Colloquium for Emerging Senior Scientists (ACCESS XII)"

    8 am, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Friday, July 31, 2015, 8:00 am

    Hosted by: Ernie Lewis

  9. AUG

    1

    Saturday

    Colloquium

    "Atmospheric Chemistry Colloquium for Emerging Senior Scientists (ACCESS XII)"

    8 am, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Saturday, August 1, 2015, 8:00 am

    Hosted by: Ernie Lewis

  10. AUG

    5

    Wednesday

    HET/RIKEN Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Raffaele D'Agnolo, Institute for Advanced Study

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, August 5, 2015, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Chien-Yi Chen

  11. AUG

    5

    Wednesday

    HET/RIKEN seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Raffaele D'Agnolo, Institute for Advanced Study

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, August 5, 2015, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Chien-Yi Chen

  12. AUG

    12

    Wednesday

    HET/RIKEN Seminar

    "Constraining Extended Higgs Sectors at the LHC and Beyond"

    Presented by Tania Robens, Technical University of Dresden

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, August 12, 2015, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Sally Dawson

  13. AUG

    14

    Friday

    Chemistry Department Colloquium

    "Hydrogen Storage in Formic Acid/Formate Solutions - Kinetics and Mechanism"

    Presented by Prof. Laurenczy Gabor, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Switzerland

    11 am, Hamilton Seminar Room, Bldg. 555

    Friday, August 14, 2015, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Etsuko Fujita

  14. SEP

    8

    Tuesday

    Joint Nuclear Physics and Particle Physics Seminar

    "Understanding the nature of neutrinos via neutrinoless double-beta decay"

    Presented by Wenqin Xu, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, September 8, 2015, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Jin Huang

    Neutrinos provide a critical portal to physics beyond the Standard Model, yet the nature of neutrinos is largely unknown, including the neutrino mass hierarcy and if neutrinos are Majorana particles. Majorana particles are fermions that are their own antiparticles. Neutrinos being Majorana particles would explicitly violate lepton number conservation, and would pave the way to understand the matter-antimatter asymmetry in the universe. Neutrinoless double-beta (0 ) decay is a hypothesized process where two neutrons decay into two protons and two electrons simultaneously without emitting neutrinos. It is possible only if neutrinos are Majorana particles, and it is the only feasible way to experimentally establish the Majorana or Dirac nature of neutrinos. The observation of 0 decay would also provide complementary information related to neutrino masses. After decades of experimental e orts, the next generation 0 decay experiments will have a signi cant discovery potential to observe 0 decay, if neutrinos are indeed Majorana particles. In this talk, we will discuss the physics of neutrinoless double beta decay and review the experiments searching for it. We will focus on the Majorana Demonstrator, a 40-kg modular Germanium detector array, which searches for 0 decay in 76Ge and aims at demonstrating a path forward to next generation 0 decay experiments.

  15. SEP

    30

    Wednesday

    BSA Noon Recital

    "Enso String Quartet: Salonen, Sibelius"

    12 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Wednesday, September 30, 2015, 12:00 pm

  16. SEP

    30

    Wednesday

    CFN Proposal Deadline

    "CFN Proposal Deadline for January-April Cycle 2016"

    11:45 pm, CFN

    Wednesday, September 30, 2015, 11:45 pm

  17. OCT

    1

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Top Quark Precision Physics and the Fate of the Universe"

    Presented by Andreas Jung, Fermilab

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, October 1, 2015, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: Ketevi A. Assamagan

    The talk will discuss recent measurements in the top quark sector, the heaviest known elementary particle known so far, performed at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider and at the LHC. I will highlight Tevatron results that are competitive to those at the LHC, especially regarding the top quark mass and production asymmetry. The talk will also present CMS results on the top quark mass and Yukawa coupling. I will discuss the implications for the standard model electroweak sector regarding the vacuum stability. I will conclude with an outlook towards the high luminosity phase of the LHC and the CMS silicon detector upgrades required for the high luminosity phase.

  18. OCT

    12

    Monday

    Workshop

    "HEPIX"

    9 am, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Monday, October 12, 2015, 9:00 am

    Hosted by: Tony Wong

  19. OCT

    13

    Tuesday

    Workshop

    "HEPIX"

    9 am, Hamilton Seminar Room, Bldg. 555

    Tuesday, October 13, 2015, 9:00 am

    Hosted by: Tony Wong

  20. OCT

    14

    Wednesday

    Workshop

    "HEPIX"

    9 am, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, October 14, 2015, 9:00 am

    Hosted by: Tony Wong

  21. OCT

    15

    Thursday

    Workshop

    "HEPIX"

    9 am, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, October 15, 2015, 9:00 am

    Hosted by: Tony Wong

  22. OCT

    15

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Recent Results from the BaBar Experiment"

    Presented by David Norvil Brown, University of Louisville

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, October 15, 2015, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: Ketevi A. Assamagan

    TBD

  23. OCT

    16

    Friday

    Workshop

    "HEPIX"

    9 am, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, October 16, 2015, 9:00 am

    Hosted by: Tony Wong