General Information

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  • RHIC

    Brookhaven physicists are using detectors at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider to explore how the matter that makes up atomic nuclei behaved just after the Big Bang.

  • ATLAS

    Brookhaven physicists and engineers are collaborators in the ATLAS experiment at CERN's Large Hadron Collider.

  • Neutrinos

    LBNE and the Daya Bay Neutrino Experiments seek to understand the subtle oscillations of neutrinos, ghost-like particles formed in the heart of stars

  • Cosmology

    In the LSST and BOSS experiments, Brookhaven physicists seek to measure and constrain the properties of dark matter, dark energy and the standard cosmological model.

Nuclear Physics

PHENIX

Responsibile for the operation and  physics exploitation of the PHENIX experiment at RHIC.

STAR

Responsibile for the operation and  physics exploitation of the STAR experiment at RHIC.

RHIC Spin

Leads, supports, and provides for the common requirements of the RHIC spin program, particularly for polarimetry.

RIKEN BNL Research Center

Conducts quantum chromodynamics and proton spin structure research.

Nuclear Theory

Conducts research to understand many body aspects of QCD, including the properties of hot and dense matter as well high gluon density matter.  

Lattice Gauge Theory

Studies properties of hot and dense matter using lattice QCD methods.

RHIC Computing Facility

Provides computing services for experiments at RHIC, and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope project.

High-Energy Physics

Cosmology & Astrophysics

Solving problems in observational cosmology: how to measure and constrain properties of dark matter, dark energy and the standard cosmological model.

Electronic Detector

Studies very rare processes at the Intensity Frontier.

Omega

Group members are collaborators on the LHC ATLAS experiment.

Physics Application

Develops physics applications software for the LHC ATLAS experiment.

High-Energy Theory

Focuses on providing theoretical foundation for the search for physics beyond the standard model, including lattice QCD calculations of key quantities required for this quest.

ATLAS Computing Facility

Provides computing services for U.S. ATLAS.

High-Energy Physics

Baryonic Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey

BOSS studies dark energy—the force thought to be responsible for the universe’s accelerating expansion.

Dark Energy Survey

Seeks to probe the origin of the accelerating universe and uncover the nature of dark energy by measuring the 14-billion-year history of cosmic expansion.

Large Synoptic Survey Telescope

A 3.2 gigapixel camera mounted in a  ground-based telescope designed to produce the widest, densest, and most complete images of our universe ever captured.

Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment

An international collaboration working to precisely measure neutrino oscillations.

ATLAS

An experiment at CERN's Large Hadron Collider designed to detect particles created by proton-proton collisions.

Daya Bay Neutrino Experiment

An international collaboration studying the subtle transformations of neutrinos.

MicroBooNE

Measures low energy neutrino cross sections and investigates low energy excess events observed by the MiniBooNE experiment.

Muon g-2

A high precision measurement of the muon's g-2 value. A deviation between theory and observed value will suggest the existence of new particles.

Mu2e

Experiment which directly probes the Intensity Frontier and aids research on the Energy and Cosmic frontiers with precision measurements to characterize properties of new particles.

Nuclear Physics

PHENIX

An experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider designed to explore quark gluon plasma.

STAR

An experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider designed to explore quark gluon plasma.

Electron Ion Collider (Future)

Plans for the world's first electron-nucleus collider, also known as eRHIC, call for the addition of a 5 to 10 GeV electron ring inside the RHIC tunnel.

The Physics Department is part of Brookhaven's Nuclear & Particle Physics Directorate.

Seminars & Colloquia

  1. JUL

    28

    Today

    Physics Colloquium

    "Exotic and conventional hadrons from lattice QCD"

    Presented by Sasa Prelovsek, University of Ljubljana, Jefferson Lab

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, July 28, 2015, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: Rob Pisarski

    Faced with the recent experimental discoveries of pentaquarks and tetraquarks, one would like to establish whether these states arise directly from the fundamental theory of strong interactions - QCD. I will present how the exotic and conventional hadrons are investigated with ab-initio lattice QCD simulations. The approach will be illustrated with recent lattice results on the charmonium-like states Zc and X(3872), conventional resonances, bound states and pentaquarks.

  1. JUL

    31

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN seminar

    "Generalized Landau-level representation for spin-1/2 fermions and its applications"

    Presented by Igor Shovkovy, Arizona State University

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, July 31, 2015, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Soeren Schlichting

    I will discuss the recently proposed generalized Landau-level representation for charged fermions in an external magnetic field. After demonstrating its key advantages over the other existing representations, I will mention several of its applications. One of them is the quantum Hall effect in graphene, where the new representation is essential for a sufficiently detailed theoretical description, in which all the dynamical parameters are running functions of the Landau-level index. The other application is the chiral asymmetry induced in dense relativistic matter in an external magnetic field. The quantitative measure of such an asymmetry is the chiral shift parameter that measures a relative shift of the longitudinal momenta (along the direction of the magnetic field) in the dispersion relations of opposite chirality fermions. Using the language of solid state physics, the corresponding ground state of dense relativistic matter could be interpreted as a Weyl metal state. Incidentally, the exact same mechanism also works in real Dirac metals.

  2. SEP

    8

    Tuesday

    Joint Nuclear Physics and Particle Physics Seminar

    "Understanding the nature of neutrinos via neutrinoless double-beta decay"

    Presented by Wenqin Xu, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, September 8, 2015, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Jin Huang

    Neutrinos provide a critical portal to physics beyond the Standard Model, yet the nature of neutrinos is largely unknown, including the neutrino mass hierarcy and if neutrinos are Majorana particles. Majorana particles are fermions that are their own antiparticles. Neutrinos being Majorana particles would explicitly violate lepton number conservation, and would pave the way to understand the matter-antimatter asymmetry in the universe. Neutrinoless double-beta (0 ) decay is a hypothesized process where two neutrons decay into two protons and two electrons simultaneously without emitting neutrinos. It is possible only if neutrinos are Majorana particles, and it is the only feasible way to experimentally establish the Majorana or Dirac nature of neutrinos. The observation of 0 decay would also provide complementary information related to neutrino masses. After decades of experimental e orts, the next generation 0 decay experiments will have a signi cant discovery potential to observe 0 decay, if neutrinos are indeed Majorana particles. In this talk, we will discuss the physics of neutrinoless double beta decay and review the experiments searching for it. We will focus on the Majorana Demonstrator, a 40-kg modular Germanium detector array, which searches for 0 decay in 76Ge and aims at demonstrating a path forward to next generation 0 decay experiments.

  1. AUG

    13

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Exciting New Results From LHCb"

    Presented by Sheldon Stone, Syracuse University

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, August 13, 2015, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: Elizabeth Worchester

    LHCb has presented groundbreaking new results this summer in exotic particle spectroscopy and searches for new physics.

  2. AUG

    21

    Friday

    Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    "Caught in the Act! Live Observations of Catalysts Using High-pressure Scanning Probe Microscopy"

    Presented by Irene M. N. Groot, Leiden Institute of Physics and Leiden Institute of Chemistry, the Netherlands

    10 am, CFN, Bldg. 735, first fl. conference room A

    Friday, August 21, 2015, 10:00 am

    Hosted by: Anibal Boscoboinik

    Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar Caught in the Act! Live Observations of Catalysts Using High-pressure Scanning Probe Microscopy Irene M. N. Groot Leiden Institute of Physics and Leiden Institute of Chemistry, the Netherlands Friday, August 21, 2015 10:00 am Bldg. 735 " Conf. Rm. A Recently it has become clear that essential differences can exist between the behavior of catalysts under industrial conditions (high pressure and temperature) and the (ultra) high vacuum conditions of traditional laboratory experiments. Differences in structure, composition, reaction mechanism, activity, and selectivity have been observed. These observations indicated the presence of the so-called pressure gap, and made it clear that meaningful results can only be obtained at high pressures and temperatures. However, most of the techniques traditionally used to study catalysts and their reactions were designed to operate under (ultra) high vacuum conditions. To bridge the pressure gap, the last years have seen a tremendous effort in designing new instruments and adapting existing ones to be able to investigate catalysts in situ under industrially relevant conditions. This talk focuses on the development of scanning probe microscopy for operando observations of active model catalysts. In our group, we have developed set-ups that combine an ultrahigh vacuum environment for model catalyst preparation and characterization with a high-pressure flow reactor cell, integrated with either a scanning tunneling microscope or an atomic force microscope. With these set-ups we are able to perform atomic-scale investigations of well-defined model catalysts under industrial conditions. Additionally, we combine the structural information from scanning probe microscopy with time-resolved mass spectrometry measurements on the gas mixture that leaves the re

  3. SEP

    8

    Tuesday

    Joint Nuclear Physics and Particle Physics Seminar

    "Understanding the nature of neutrinos via neutrinoless double-beta decay"

    Presented by Wenqin Xu, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, September 8, 2015, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Jin Huang

    Neutrinos provide a critical portal to physics beyond the Standard Model, yet the nature of neutrinos is largely unknown, including the neutrino mass hierarcy and if neutrinos are Majorana particles. Majorana particles are fermions that are their own antiparticles. Neutrinos being Majorana particles would explicitly violate lepton number conservation, and would pave the way to understand the matter-antimatter asymmetry in the universe. Neutrinoless double-beta (0 ) decay is a hypothesized process where two neutrons decay into two protons and two electrons simultaneously without emitting neutrinos. It is possible only if neutrinos are Majorana particles, and it is the only feasible way to experimentally establish the Majorana or Dirac nature of neutrinos. The observation of 0 decay would also provide complementary information related to neutrino masses. After decades of experimental e orts, the next generation 0 decay experiments will have a signi cant discovery potential to observe 0 decay, if neutrinos are indeed Majorana particles. In this talk, we will discuss the physics of neutrinoless double beta decay and review the experiments searching for it. We will focus on the Majorana Demonstrator, a 40-kg modular Germanium detector array, which searches for 0 decay in 76Ge and aims at demonstrating a path forward to next generation 0 decay experiments.

  4. OCT

    1

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Top Quark Precision Physics and the Fate of the Universe"

    Presented by Andreas Jung, Fermilab

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, October 1, 2015, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: Ketevi A. Assamagan

    The talk will discuss recent measurements in the top quark sector, the heaviest known elementary particle known so far, performed at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider and at the LHC. I will highlight Tevatron results that are competitive to those at the LHC, especially regarding the top quark mass and production asymmetry. The talk will also present CMS results on the top quark mass and Yukawa coupling. I will discuss the implications for the standard model electroweak sector regarding the vacuum stability. I will conclude with an outlook towards the high luminosity phase of the LHC and the CMS silicon detector upgrades required for the high luminosity phase.

  5. OCT

    15

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Recent Results from the BaBar Experiment"

    Presented by David Norvil Brown, University of Louisville

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, October 15, 2015, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: Ketevi A. Assamagan

    TBD